Flight …

Haibun
There have been a couple of times when I have “taken flight” in a airplane. No, I am not speaking of travel something that David and I have enjoyed a good bit of until recently. I mentioned earlier taking the controls of a little dark red two-seater as we went in between the Green Mountains one morning with a friend when I was sixteen. There was a second time. It was 2005 in November. I had just been through the biggest spiritual experience of my life. It took six – eight weeks, it was exhilarating and exceptionally painful. It would leave me dazed and confused. And I knew full well that it looked like I was having a nervous breakdown. I sensibly engaged a bodyworker who worked with my energy and a exercise therapist. I did this to assist with keeping myself grounded. It was the hardest thing that I have ever been through. It changed my life and taught me a lot. However, I had no idea initially what it was that I was meant to do. What came to me was that at 60 years of age I was meant to learn to fly an airplane. This TERRIFIED me. I found an old grass airfield with wonderful old hangars from the 20s, and a little flying school. I learned to fly a 1947 Luscombe 8 Taildragger. I loved that little plane, I used to come over to the airfield and wash it … ha … lying on one of those things that mechanics lie on so I could get under the fuselage, in linen and pearls. I really loved it when I learned to take off and to land. I did not get a license, this is a wealthy man’s sport, no bones about it. Buying a plane is a very expensive operation. And the buying isn’t the expensive part, it is the insurance, the hangar space and the upkeep. What was actually taking place was that I was facing my ultimate fear of heights and my growing fear of flying. Even if one flies a good bit it is not unusual to acquire a fear of flying as one ages. I did exactly what I was meant to do at the time.

persepolis far away in persia – quick flight

Posted with gratitude at The Poetry Pantry #158.

Disgorged Words

What is it that I am putting off?
Surely I have examined the issue for a long enough period of time.

Dear reader are you doing what you are meant to do?
What have you put off doing that you should be doing?

First, I don’t call myself a writer, I don’t really call myself anything.
I have dabbled in numerous arts including poetry.

It never occurred to me to “get published.”
I have really never had the desire and yet that is meant to be the goal, isn’t it.

So, back to the “what have you not done that you ought be doing?”
That is my way of putting it on you, giving myself more time, procrastinating a bit more.

My life has been one of learning lessons.
Not just learning lessons as they come, but purposefully seeking out the lessons to learn.

There was a time when twenty-nine that I wished to pursue further spiritual growth.
But God said: If that is so, you will need to stop smoking.” Bummer.

But I did quit because I was more interested at that point in reaching my goal.
So what am I putting off now, today?

I am old now and still learning so why is it so hard to begin this task?
There are so many excuses, I don’t know how, I don’t have time, I don’t want to.

I have done the healing, done the forgiving, gone back, way back in time.
I have the answers. I know why she was the way she was.

So who am I supposed to write about? My mother is dead. My father is dead.
And I know nothing about memoir.

There you have it. How and where do I begin?
Isn’t it a bit presumptuous of me to wish to put this all down on paper?

OK, the computer?
I really, truly do not know.

Now playing at dVerse OpenLinkNight

The Mag 136 – Haibun

Flying Down 2006 by David Salle

Haibun:

In the middle of this painting is the swirl.  It dominates the painting and my psyche, taking me back to a second spiritual experience that I had within my lifetime.  As you can see in the painting … this experience turned my life upside down, represented by the duck.  I became very focused and I began to see life differently as defined by the women in the painting looking clearly back at you.  The first actual and real response to my experience was to make myself learn to fly at sixty years of age.  Flying, something that at that time I did regularly, was beginning to frighten me more and more.  This fear began after 911 … and I might add is not unusual after one reaches forty years of age.

Haiku:

flying 1947 luscombe 8 tail dragger – no fear

Linked back to The Mag 136 (photo prompt from The Mag)

NaHaiWriMo May 7th Haiku and Haibun Prompt: Fear

Haibun:
Mr. Takahashi was an Japanese immigrant in the US when WWII broke out. He desired citizenship which is why he served in the Merchant Marines for four years. But this did not help him in his goal. He joined the US Army, was taken prisoner of war in Japan. Yet when the war was over and he returned home … no citizenship. A congressman stepped in and got him his citizenship. He became a doctor serving US veterans of WWII. He and his family returned to Japan to visit … his tears did not stop flowing.

Haiku:
prisoner of war returns to japan – mixture of sweat and tears